Brothers Osborne

Doc Roc Presents

Brothers Osborne

Troy Cartwright

Fri May 26

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:15 pm

Cain's Ballroom

Tulsa, OK

$23.00 - $38.00

This event is all ages


Advance $23 | Day of Show $25 | Door $25 | Mezzanine (21+) $38

There is a $2 fee that applies to each ticket purchased at the Cain's Box Office.

No re-entry! No smoking! No refunds!

Support acts are subject to change without notice!

Brothers Osborne
Brothers Osborne
Years before they climbed the country charts with songs like "Stay a Little Longer" and "Rum," the Brothers Osborne grew up in Deale, Maryland, a small fishing town on the Atlantic seaboard. It was a cozy place, filled with blue-collar workers who made their living on the water. During the weekends, many of those workers would head over to the Osborne household, where a series of loose, all-night jam sessions filled the Maryland air with the sounds of Bob Seger, Hank Williams, Tom Petty and George Jones.

The Osborne siblings strummed their first chords during those jam sessions. From the very start, TJ Osborne was the brother with the voice. He sang in a thick, low baritone, crooning like Johnny Cash long before he was even old enough to drive. Older brother John, on the other hand, was the family's guitar shredder, his fingers capable of down-home bluegrass licks, arena-worthy rock riffs, country twang, and everything in between. Combined, the two Osbornes could play everything from traditional country music to rock & roll, creating a broad, full-bodied sound that would eventually fill the 11 songs on their major-label debut, Pawn Shop.

Like its title suggests, Pawn Shop offers a little bit of everything. There's bluesy slide guitar, country duets, southern rock solos, harmonies, and plenty of groove. The hooks are big, the guitars are loud, and the songs — every last one of them co-written by the Osbornes, who reached out to award-winning songwriters like Shane McAnally and Ross Copperman for help — introduce a duo whose music bridges the gap between the mainstream and the alternative world. Some songs were written at home in Nashville, while others came together on the road, where the guys spent several years headlining their own club shows, touring the country with Darius Rucker, and playing some of the biggest arenas in America with fellow rule-breaker Eric Church.

"Most duos are built on singing," says TJ "But John is an incredible guitar player, and this band is built on me singing and John playing guitar. It gives us two parallels that work nicely together."

"It's like an old-school rock approach," adds John, who cites classic bands like Aerosmith and the Allman Brothers as influences on the duo's dynamic. "Groups like that always had the lead singer as well as the sideman guitar player. That's what we're going for, too. We're carving our own path in country music."

That unique path has already led the band toward the upper half of the country charts. "Rum" got them there first, mixing the feel-good sunshine of a beach tune with a far more realistic storyline. There's no actual beach in "Rum," after all. Instead, Brothers Osborne turn the song into a tribute to the simple pleasures that their Maryland hometown offers: friends, good weather, and the occasional drink. They even filmed the song's music video in Deale, filling the clip with footage of friends, relatives, and locals.

"Most people we grew up with don't go to these beautiful beaches," says TJ. "They can't afford to do it. They don't have the time for it. What we're most familiar with is people going to the local bars and hanging out with each other." John adds, "We tried to have the biggest time possible with what little we had. 'Rum' explains that." The brothers agree, "We had to say it from our own perspective."


A similar theme runs throughout "Dirt Rich" and "Pawn Shop," two songs that stress the importance of appreciating what you've got. Pawn Shop dishes up plenty of love songs, too, from "Loving Me Back" — an old-school country duet featuring vocals from Lee Ann Womack — to "Stay a Little Longer," the band's biggest hit to date. While a three-minute guitar solo brings "Stay a Little Longer" to an epic, anthemic close, Brothers Osborne also devote time to more laid-back songs, from the nostalgic California country of "21 Summer" to the 420-friendly "Greener Pastures."

Brothers Osborne, who co-produced the album with Jay Joyce (the award-winning producer behind Little Big Town's Painkiller, Eric Church's The Outsiders, and Carrie Underwood's Storyteller), recorded most of Pawn Shop during breaks in their busy touring schedule, using members of their own touring band rather than session musicians from the Nashville community. The result is an album that's stamped with the unmistakable mark of a band. It doesn't sound like two singers, flanked by anonymous players. Instead, it sounds like a group of road warriors who've spent years sharing bus seats and hotel rooms, creating the sort of chemistry that can't be faked. Pawn Shop is both raw and real, and Brothers Osborne — who, years after those household jam sessions in Deale, now have a handful of nationwide tours under their belts, songs on the charts, and a career on the rise — are no longer a family secret.
Troy Cartwright
Troy Cartwright
"It's the stuff you dream about," says Troy Cartwright of his whirlwind year. The young Dallas native began to see a lifetime of hard work pay off in spades in 2015, as he signed with Sunfire Entertainment, released a critically acclaimed debut album, cracked the top 25 on the Texas Music Chart, and shared bills with Hayes Carll, Randy Rogers, Turnpike Troubadours, Green River Ordinance, and more. "This is all I wanted to do since I was 14," he reflects, "and now I'm doing it."

With so much momentum on his side, it's no surprise that Cartwright titled his new release 'Don't Fade.' It's a note-to-self that he more than lives up to on the EP, bringing together the heartfelt vulnerability of Ryan Adams and the arena-ready anthems of Eric Church into an infectious, genre-blurring masterpiece. The tracks showcase Cartwright's considerable growth, both as a writer and performer, while honing in on the sharp lyrics and soulful delivery that earned his self-titled debut widespread praise in Texas and beyond. The Dallas Observer called that record "one of the very best of 2015," while the Fort Worth Star Telegram raved that "there’s an ease and a polish…belying Cartwright’s relative youth," and Red Dirt Nation said that it "stirs what makes us all feel young and poignantly reminds us how fragile we all are when it comes to love, heartbreak and home." For Cartwright, though, it was only just the prelude.

"You never know what you don't know," he reflects from his newly adopted hometown of Nashville. "I'm very proud of that first record and some of those songs have done very well for me, but with a whole additional year-and-a-half of hard touring and writing under my belt when we recorded 'Don't Fade,' I felt like I had a much better idea of how I wanted to sound and who I was as an artist."

Cartwright grew up in a conservative Texas home where his exposure to modern music was limited primarily to the 'Forrest Gump' soundtrack and Steven Curtis Chapman records. For his twelfth birthday, his parents gave him an acoustic guitar, and suddenly the entire world opened up. He discovered singer-songwriters and alt-country troubadours, contemporaries like Pete Yorn and classic artists like John Prine. It led him to begin penning his own songs, and by the time he hit high school, he was playing regularly in bars and churches. A summer program at NYU exposed Cartwright to the world outside of Dallas and inspired him to head even further from home to attend the Berklee College of Music in Boston.

Cartwright worked his way through school with odd jobs in the music industry and wedding band gigs, and while they paid the bills, they left him unsatisfied and more convinced than ever that he needed to take the leap with his own music. He moved back to Texas and recorded an EP, 'Bull Run,' that earned him top honors in the B.W. Stevenson Songwriting Competition. A performance with John Fullbright led Cartwright to Oklahoma, where he collaborated with producer Wes Sharon on the self-titled debut that would break him onto the Texas radio charts.

Throughout it all, Cartwright was a hustler to his core, playing 100+ shows per year without an agent or a manager, working harder than he ever had before in his life but moving closer towards his goals every day. The quality of the music and the exhilarating live performances were turning heads throughout the south, and that's when Cartwright caught the ear of fellow Texas songwriter Rob Baird, who offered to produce 'Don't Fade' with Brian Douglas Phillips at Phillips’ Austin-based Rattle Trap Studio.

"We spent three or four days in total at Rob's house before we went into the studio because I had between 30-50 songs that I had written," remembers Cartwright. "Rob and I went through each of them and pared the list down to figure out what made for a cohesive collection and what kind of sound we wanted to go after."

The sound that they ultimately landed on is instantly appealing, a warm, radio-friendly blend that calls to mind everything from Will Hoge to The Old 97's. Earworm opener "Never Coming Back" is an ideal showcase for Cartwright's gifts, with his silky-smooth vocals riding a laid-back drum groove punctuated by dynamic electric guitar riffs and classic rock organ swells.

"That was one of the first co-writes I ever did in Nashville," says Cartwright. "I wrote it with Ty Graham, who had actually been my next door neighbor at Berklee during my freshman year. We always used to talk about girls and relationships in college, and when we sat down to write this song, the story was something we'd both experienced in our personal lives, so it came together really naturally."

Cartwright takes a darker turn on "Busted," a driving, gritty tune inspired by the breakdown of a truck in the west Texas heat that mirrored the breakdown of his own crumbling relationship, while "Nobody But You" channels the pain of staying behind while a loved one leaves, and the sweetly emotional "Don't Fade" battles the inevitable passage of time. One of the most special moments for Cartwright, though, comes at the end of the EP, as the stripped-down acoustic meditation of "Arkansas" drifts off into an ethereal soundscape like the last rays of light at sunset.

"That ending was a very specific idea that came to me on a camping trip with my roommate," remembers Cartwright. "We were spending the days and nights out in the middle of nowhere just listening to the crickets chirp and trying to figure out life, and I wanted to recreate that feeling."

The ability to capture such intimate, meaningful moments is the magic of Cartwright's songwriting. These are tunes about coming and going, uncertainty and change, finding yourself and what you're willing to sacrifice for your dreams. There are no dramatic revelations here, just the steadily deepening understanding of self that comes with maturing. Cartwright renders the sound of growing up beautifully and in vivid detail, capturing the anxiety and the ecstasy in all its messy, human glory. For a kid who grew up worshipping songwriters, to craft such exceptional music is to truly live the dream, and with another full length album on the way, it's safe to say Troy Cartwright's years are going to just keep getting bigger and bigger.
Venue Information:
Cain's Ballroom
423 N Main St.
Tulsa, OK, 74103
http://www.cainsballroom.com