Portugal. the Man

Doc Roc Presents

Portugal. the Man

Lido

Thu Oct 05

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:15 pm

Cain's Ballroom

Tulsa, OK

Sold Out

This event is all ages


Advance $28
Day of Show $30
Door $30
Mezzanine (21+) $43

There is a $2 fee that applies to each ticket purchased at the Cain's Box Office.

No re-entry! No smoking! No refunds!

Support acts are subject to change without notice!

Portugal. the Man
Portugal. the Man
Everything You Need To Know About Portugal. The Man’s New Album.

Well, we’re two full months into 2017 and the world continues to burn like an avalanche of flaming biohazard material sliding down a mountain of used needles into a canyon full of rat feces. But hey, it’s not all bad: Portugal. The Man has a new album coming out called Woodstock.

PTM’s last album came out over three years ago—a long gap for a band who’ve dropped roughly an album a year since 2006. And in true, prolific band fashion, they’ve spent almost every minute since 2013 working on an album called Gloomin + Doomin. They created a shit-ton of individual songs, but as a whole, none of them hung together in a way that felt right. Then John Gourley, PTM’s lead singer, made a trip home to Wasilla, Alaska, (Home of Portugal. The Man’s biggest fan, Sarah Palin) and two things happened that completely changed the album’s trajectory.

First, John got some parental tough love from his old man, who called John on the proverbial carpet or dogsled or whatever you put people on when you want to yell at them in Alaska. “What’s taking so long to finish the album?” John’s dad said. “Isn’t that what bands do? Write songs and then put them out?” Like fathers and unlicensed therapists tend to do, John’s dad cut him deep. The whole thing started John thinking about why the band seemed to be stuck on a musical elliptical machine from hell and, more importantly, about how to get off of it.

Second, fate stuck its wiener in John’s ear again when he found his dad’s ticket stub from the original 1969 Woodstock music festival. It seems like a small thing, but talking to his dad about Woodstock ’69 knocked something loose in John’s head. He realized that, in the same tradition of bands from that era, Portugal. The Man needed to speak out about the world crumbling around them. With these two ideas converging, the band made a seemingly bat-shit-crazy decision: they took all of the work they had done for the three years prior and they threw it out.

It wasn’t easy and there was the constant threat that the band's record label might have them killed, but the totally insane decision paid off. With new, full-on, musical boners, the band went back to the studio—working with John Hill (In The Mountain In The Cloud), Danger Mouse (Evil Friends), Mike D (Everything Cool), and longtime collaborator Casey Bates (The one consistent producer since the first record). In this new-found creative territory, the album that became Woodstock rolled out naturally from there

Remember that mountain of burning needles we were talking about? Good. Because Woodstock is an album (Including the new single “Feel It Still”) that—with optimism and heart—points at the giant pile and says, “Hey, this pile is fucked up!” And if you think that pile is fucked up too, you owe it to yourself—hell, to all of us—to get out there and do something about it.
Lido
Lido
Three years ago, the name 'Lido' was something of a mystery. People were left guessing where these hyperactive, neon-coloured productions they kept hearing were coming from, that blended bouncy hip-hop with earworm hooks.

The man behind the music has since surfaced: 23-year-old Norwegian Peder Losnegård, a producer with an insatiable appetite for beat-making and a unique take on the interplay between genres. In the last year and a half, Lido has embarked on a sold-out US tour, produced for Chance the Rapper and A$AP Mob, while also executive producing Halsey's 'Badlands.' More recently, Kanye's 'The Life of Pablo' inspired him to chuck the album into a blender for an eight-minute reimagining; the 'Life of Peder,' hitting 1 million streams in less than 24 hours.

Lido dropped his debut album ‘Everything’ to critical acclaim in October 2016. The recording process was born from a difficult period in Peder’s life. “It’s an unconventional breakup album,” he starts. “It’s not an album about a girl, it’s an album because of a girl — my healing process after losing somebody that meant a lot to me. It’s called ‘Everything’ because it's the story of when you let somebody be everything to you, you risk losing that everything and being left with just yourself.”

Lead single 'Crazy' melts Daft Punk heat into Zapp & Roger talkbox magic, with Peder blasting his signature rising, HudMo-style chords. But 'Everything' doesn't just explore the uplifting side of emotion. "I wanted to explore the nuances of feelings -- there's so much energy in sadness, anger in sadness, there's frustration in sadness," he explains. "I wanted to explore how I can make emotional music that's more complicated than what people usually do when they try to tell a story."

Each track makes up an intricate chapter of his story, which he's keen for fans to unpack themselves, and as a result it was "such a scary album for me," he says. "It's so emotional, and so honest." Lido isn't one of the crop of EDM producers who just press play on stage. "I'm more confident and more in my element when I'm on a stage rather than anywhere else," he says.

Performing live, Lido flits from drums to keys, sometimes even backed by an orchestra and compelling visual arrangements. This is an individual who doesn't do anything by halves -- and for that reason it's clear that 2016 is going to be the most exciting yet in the life of Peder.
Venue Information:
Cain's Ballroom
423 N Main St.
Tulsa, OK, 74103
http://www.cainsballroom.com