TOADIES

Doc Roc Presents

TOADIES

The Supersuckers, Battleme

Wed Apr 09

Doors: 7:00 pm

Cain's Ballroom

Tulsa, OK

$21.00

This event is all ages


The Rubberneck 20th Anniversary Tour

Show :: 8:00pm (times subject to change)

Advance $19 | Day of Show $21 | Door $21 | Mezzanine (21+) $34

There is a $2 fee that applies to each ticket purchased at the Cain's Box Office.

No re-entry! No smoking! No refunds!

Oklahoma Joe’s will be serving their full menu from 7pm – 9pm.

Toadies
Toadies
Looking over his shoulder at Rubberneck, the Toadies’ platinum-selling 1994 debut, drummer Mark Reznicek is reflective. “Hard to believe it’s been 20 years,” he says. “It seems like yesterday. But, at the same time, it was a lifetime ago.”

The songs on Rubberneck are fearless, literate and visceral. Their protagonists are perceived as anti-heroes: stalkers, serial killers and religious zealots (some are all three). Certainly, they’re not your average, accessible radio fodder. Well, the Toadies weren’t concerned about that. “We didn’t even have singles in mind,” Reznicek says. “Or the idea of even possibly getting on the radio. We didn’t think that would ever happen.” But “Possum Kingdom” remains a radio staple even today – and “Backslider” and “Tyler” still pop up. It’s because raw expression makes for the most powerful art.

The Toadies remain raw. Vaden Todd Lewis still sings as though he’s on the precipice of
insanity, clinging tenaciously but perhaps already plummeting. Lewis’s and Clark Vogeler’s
guitars rip and tear like thick fingernails at supple flesh. Reznicek and bass player Doni Blair (who joined the band in 2008) fuel the fury with relentless, seething rhythm.

When these sounds and those images and themes mix, the effect is pure adrenaline. The manic, chugging-choogling strains of Rubberneck’s opening instrumental salvo “Mexican Hairless” run pell-mell into the equally breakneck “Mister Love,” a backhanded plea for salvation. The pace slows, a little, for “Backslider,” where a father drowns his nine-year-old son in deliverance. And then “Possum Kingdom,” the Toadies’ notoriously creepy megahit, slows things down again with a dangerous antihero’s offer of a different salvation.

In just these four songs, Rubberneck leaves the listener feeling fed. The songs are meaty, with much to chew on: images to parse, significances to consider, guitar riffs and drum parts to mime. It continues for seven more tracks – including fan favorites like “Tyler” and “I Come From The Water” – and leaves you satisfied and a little uncomfortable.

It’s the same with every spin of Rubberneck. That’s why it endures. And it’s why the Toadies, with their current label Kirtland Records, and the blessing of original label Interscope Records, are reissuing Rubberneck – remastered and beefed up with five unreleased tracks from the same era – for a new generation.

Rubberneck’s staying power breeds new fans to go along with the Toadies’ early-adopters,
whose faith never flagged even as the band struggled to release new music. When their would-be second album languished on the label shelf, they circulated demos and bought tickets. Even when a different second album, 2001’s Hell Below/Stars Above, fared poorly and the Toadies broke up, the fans’ steadfast evangelism continued. “These are fans from when Rubberneck first came out,” Reznicek says. “They’ve turned their younger siblings, and their kids, on to us. We see them all the time – whole families wearing Toadies shirts. It’s pretty cool.”

A one-off show in Dallas in 2006 became a full-fledged reunion. The Toadies have since steadily built momentum. A third album, No Deliverance, came in 2008 and saw the band playing Lollapalooza. The heretofore-lost album, Feeler, finally materialized in 2010. A new album, Play.Rock.Music came out in 2012. Tours followed each release. The band’s annual Dia de Los Toadies festival – at which the likes of Gary Clark Jr., Ben Kweller, Centro-matic, Sarah Jaffe, The Sword and Black Joe Lewis have appeared, grows each year.

Today the Toadies – and their magnum opus – are stronger than ever. Rubberneck’s new master makes it an even more striking listen. “Three of the five songs were actually recorded during same sessions,” Reznicek says. In their customary position at the end of the original sequence, these tunes actually sound as though they’re not bonuses. The loping “Run In With Dad,” where titular fanatic catches his son fornicating, could fit right in between “Backslider” and “Possum Kingdom.” Likewise “Stop It,” which is actually a Pylon cover – it wouldn’t be so out of place between “Tyler” and “Happyface.” The instrumental unfinished demo “Rockfish,” (part of which was used to create “Waterfall” from Feeler) could make a nice bookend with “Mexican Hairless.” The other rarities, Rubberneck-era live takes of “Possum Kingdom” and “Tyler” are snapshots of a band in original form.

Of course, with 20 years and thousands of shows behind them, the Toadies sound even better. On the road in 2014, supported by the Supersuckers and Battleme, the Toadies will pay tribute to their fans’ support by playing Rubberneck start-to-finish. “I honestly cannot wait to get onstage in front of these fans and play the album front to back,” says Vogeler. “I've been looking forward to it for years and, after this anniversary tour, I can’t imagine that we’ll ever do it again.” Lewis is likewise stoked. “Performing these songs will never get old for me so long as I'm able to look out and see smiling, sweaty faces looking back,” says Lewis.

The Toadies will also have vinyl copies of Rubberneck at the merch table. It’s a fitting
celebration that the band can now toast with their new signature beer (brewed by fellow Texans as Martin House Brewing), aptly dubbed Rubberneck Red. And there’s loads more to look forward to in 2014 – including a new album due this Fall. “It’s gonna be our ‘chill set’ that we play on the first night of Dia de Los Toadies,” says Reznicek. “Acoustic, stripped-down versions of our songs. Probably some new songs, some previously unreleased songs and some new covers.” Recording is currently underway with Rob Schnapf, one of Rubberneck’s original producers.

And there’ll be more where that came from.

“[The Toadies] has been a hell of a lot of hard work,” says Lewis, “but also a hell of a lot of
fun. And it continues to be every time we take the stage.”
The Supersuckers
The Supersuckers
"One of the few outfits that can call itself "The World's Greatest Rock 'n' Roll Band!" and actually get away with it, the Supersuckers eat Marshall stacks and cowboy hats and s**t out high-volume ass-kickery, Motörheading country music and Willie Nelsoning garage-punk better than virtually anyone else, ever."
– Philadelphia Weekly

ABOUT THE GREATEST ROCK N' ROLL BAND IN THE WORLD:
You've heard our name, you've seen our records, our t-shirts and our stickers. We're probably the favorite band of someone you know and yet we're still a mystery to you. Well my friend, that's okay, I'm here to fill you in and help you to get to know the greatest rock-n-roll band in the world, The Supersuckers.

Our story is almost impossible to believe. This band is literally a human cartoon. We all grew up among the dead-ends and cactus needles of Tucson, Arizona and have known each other since grade school. We graduated from the same high school together at the same time (a school immortalized in our song "Santa Rita High") and we chose to play in a band together because we liked to hang out together, not because we were great musicians or anything. I truly believe that a band is defined by their limitations, that what they can't (or won't) do is just as important as what they can do. I guess that, in this era of pre-fabricated, put-together-to-have-a-hit bands, we're kind of an aberration and I gotta tell ya that that makes us smile a little every day.

We formed the band in 1988 and we were initially a five piece called The Black Supersuckers (a name found in some quality "adult literature" we had laying around in our impeccably clean band house), with me on bass, Dan "Thunder" Bolton and Rontrose Heathman on guitars, Dancing Eagle on drums and a lead singer by the name of Eric Martin. After firmly proving ourselves to be the best band in town we decided it was time to get out of Tucson and try our luck somewhere else. So we tossed a coin with heads as New Orleans and tails as Seattle. Tails it was and in May of '89 we packed up and went north.

We had no idea that Seattle was about to become "Rock Mecca USA" we just wanted to go somewhere where we could wear our leather jackets a little more often. It was exciting and encouraging to see all of the great bands there, doing their own thing and making some kick-ass, aggressive rock-n-roll that we could relate to, so we started recording immediately. After some classic "creative differences" with our lead singer, we decided to try it as a four piece with yours truly as the singer (I was the only one who knew all the words) and The Supersuckers, as you may or may not know them today, were born.

Our first recordings as a four-piece wound up on various singles for small labels and then were compiled for a C.D. called The Songs All Sound The Same. (For the full story on these recordings I highly recommend picking up the re-issued version on our own label, Mid-Fi Recordings). But it was our live shows that caught the eyes of the good people at Sub-Pop Records and, after a particularly scorching show one night, they offered to put out our records. We said, "Buy us some beer and you got a deal!" And our long and enduring rock-n-roll ride was officially under way.

Starting with 1992,s "The Smoke Of Hell", we released a total of three rock records for Sub-Pop as well as a country record (Must've Been High), split singles with Steve Earle and The Rev. Horton Heat, countless singles and a "best-of" double album. Then we ventured out into the muddy and troubled waters of the major labels where we were signed and dropped by Interscope Records before finally (crash) landing at Koch who (barely) put out another Supersuckers masterpiece, "The Evil Powers Of Rock-n-Roll" in late 1999. We've always toured our asses off all over the world and that has never stopped. We hit the road with bands like Mudhoney, Social Distortion, Bad Religion, The Ramones, Motorhead, The Toadies, The Butthole Surfers, The Reverend Horton Heat, The Dwarves, White Zombie and Pearl Jam. We've played a few Farm Aid shows and backed Willie Nelson on The Tonight Show. Our music has appeared in T.V. shows (Beverly Hills 90210, Viva La Bam, Simple Life, Road Rules Challenge, Real World, all that crap), Movies (Baseketball, Hype) and commercials (Mountain Dew) as well as countless snow and skateboarding video compilations.

Throughout this entire time, our sole mission has been to create and perform timeless, quality music and get as many people as possible to hear it. That goal has never changed. The pursuit of that perfectly imperfect rock-n-roll moment is all we've ever been after. We've been doing this for well over a decade now and we're just getting started.

2001 found us starting our own label; Mid-Fi Recordings. We've finally decided to take control of all of our affairs and have become a lean, mean, self managed, totally independent rock-n-roll machine. We've got the greatest fans in the world and no one cares more about them and our music than we do. Having our own label gives us the freedom to make more of our music available to them without the hassles of "the middle-man" worrying about things like "marketing" or "demographics". Hell, these are just hard words. All we want to do is get some kick-ass music out to the people and with Mid-Fi we have been able to do just that. Our first release was a live country record entitled "Must've Been Live", that came out in March, 2002. Since then, we have dug into our "private reserves" and released several singles of some our finest outtake stock (a habit we intend to keep), and we've also managed to pull off a couple of "split" singles with fellow under-appreciated rockers, the Hangmen, Throwrag and Zeke.

In 2003 we unleashed the impeccably titled, Motherfuckers Be Trippin', (April 22nd, 2003) on the world. It was the perfect follow up to The Evil Powers Of Rock N Roll, it spent a couple weeks on the Billboard Independent Charts and songs from it have been featured on MTV's Real World and Viva La Bam shows as well as countless ski and snowboard videos. We even managed to work a single (Rock N Records Ain't Selling this Year) to radio where it was #1 on the RnR Specialty Charts for 4 weeks in a row (whatever that is). We have since been able to keep the releases coming at a rate that could never be achieved with any other label. In addition to MFBT, we've released my first solo album, The Sauce, as well as a second version titled Extra Sauce which features the incredible Mickey Raphael from Willie Nelson's band playing harmonica all over it and my second solo record, Old No. 2 in October of 2005. We've also established the Mid-Fi Field Recordings series which has seen the release of three live Supersuckers records and two live DVDs and will hopefully be the vehicle for our first release by an artist other than the Supersuckers. (Perpetually on the menu is Mid-Fi Field Recordings, Vol.? which will feature one of the last performances by the criminally under-appreciated Zen Guerrilla on New Years Eve 2002. I dare say this is perhaps the greatest live recording of all time!) In the works is a remix version of Old No. 2, as well, which will blow some minds for sure!

Then in 2006 we had the release of what was planned to be a series of Supersuckers E.Ps. with "Paid", which was by far the best we had ever sounded up to that point. We planned on releasing it as an E.P. so that we could keep the music coming in steady bursts. We were tired of seeing these artists release full length albums with two good songs on 'em and we wanted to be the trendsetters (once again) and show everyone a new way to get the good stuff to the peoples! We thought we'd be cranking out a few of these E.P.s and, if we had to, then we'd slap together a full length from 'em with a few new ones thrown in as well. That's the way they did it in the Fifties and Sixties and we thought that, with the way people are buying their music these days, it'd be the way to go again. Well, we were a little off in that thinking and that leads us to "Get It Together".

"Get It Together" is the brand-spanking new, FULL LENGTH record from the Supersuckers and it is far and away the most awesome thing we've ever recorded. Once again teaming up with the man who brought "Paid" to life, the incomparable Mr. Billy Joe Bowers, the band has never sounded so good. Faced with the somewhat anemic response to the E.P. format, the band decided to forego the idea of putting out several of them and went ahead and recorded enough songs for a full length. (Our first since 2003's, Motherfuckers Be Trippin'. Wow, has it really been that long?!?) Still including some of the "hits" from the Paid E.P., "Get It Together" features 12 solid new slabs of the hard hitting Supersuckers sound you've come to know and love as well as some new looks into our collective psyche. One of the biggest reasons the band has never sounded so good is the recent addition of Scott Churilla as the newest member of the Supersuckers family on the drums. You may or may not be aware that, since the 2004 departure of our original drummer, we've had a rotating cast of characters behind the drums for us. It was all very "Spinal Tap" and fun for a while but we're so happy to have it all behind us and be able to call ourselves a first class, four-piece rock and roll band once again. You may know Scott from his 10+ years as the drummer for The Reverend Horton Heat. He's absolutely incredible and we are way better than ever with him back there. And his skills are up front and center for all the world to hear on "Get It Together", available at the end of November, 2008!

WHEW! That's a lot to take in and it barely scratches the surface of all that we've done and plan to do. So, the next time you see The Supersuckers name, whether it's in the record store or on the marquee at your local nightclub, know that there's some quality, honest, ass-kicking, hard working individuals in there, trying to make your life a little better through the "Evil Powers Of Rock-n-Roll" (and the occasional detour into the country of course) and we'd love nothing better than to have you there with us as we "Get It Together"! Just remember to wear you clean underwear, because we're gonna rock your pants right off of you.

Rawkously Yours,
Eddie Spaghetti.
Battleme
Battleme
How does the story start and where will it end? Re-birth and re-discovery have been common themes to describe the inside psyche of Matt Drenik’s Battleme. 3 years ago Drenik was the lead singer of Austin, TX based psyche rock band, Lions. They had just released their first record in the UK and were touring with a reunited Monster Magnet. Then he got sick. And fought. And now his solo project, Battleme, is finding its audience. It all began with a haunting cover of Neil Young’s “Hey Hey, My My” for FX’s Sons of Anarchy. A week after its digital release, Drenik’s Battleme found itself in the Itunes Top 20 charts. A few months later, he cut a record with Ghostland Observatory’s Thomas Turner and the single “Touch” premiered on MTV Buzzworthy. The Atlantic, RCRD LBL, and MTV Hive quickly featured the track and the Washington Post claimed it as being “a career maker.” Within a few months of the record’s release, Drenik had formed a fledging new live band in Portland, OR. First it was a KEXP in studio session, then an appearance at Seattle’s Capitol Hill Block Party. A west coast tour followed with an appearance at LA’s Lobster Fest. The album track “Shoot the Noise” was picked to soundtrack the upcoming EA Sports NHL 13 video game. And Battleme’s first headlining Portland date was recently previewed by the Willamette Weekly as, “…a continuous string of battles and triumphs. And they’re pretty damn good.” This is only the beginning.

Growing up in the Cincinnati suburbs with two older brothers, Matt Drenik was always influenced by his environment. One brother was in a noise band, the other with a keen taking towards New Wave. “You had the Jesus Lizard in one room and The The in the other. I was just a kid. I didn’t understand the difference between the two.” While he didn’t understand the differences, these would be key stepping stones in his evolution.

Battleme really began in 2009 on accident when Drenik was diagnosed with uvetis, an auto immune disease that affects the eyes of which there is no known cause or cure. At the time of his diagnosis, Matt was coming off of four years recording and touring with Lions who exploded noise and energy – touring nationally and internationally with the likes of the Toadies, Local H, and Monster Magnet. Fans gravitated towards their raucous live shows as spectacles of Drenik’s heavy state of mind.

After he got sick, things began to change. “It was time to go somewhere else.” He dove back in to the things he grew up on. The Stones, Flaming Lips, Beck, Townes Van Zandt went running through the walls and Drenik wrote. He turned his thoughts to songwriting. He asked himself questions like, “what would Bob Pollard do?” This was where he gave in to a re-birth. “I wanted something different. And I didn’t have anyone telling me what rules I had to go by.”

Wanting a change, Drenik moved to Portland, OR in the summer of 2010. He spent the next several months recording over 40 songs in his girlfriend’s basement, bending from one genre to the next. He eventually narrowed them down to an 11 song record. After burning a few CDs for friends, Thomas Turner from Ghostland Observatory got a copy and responded. Drenik thought Turner might offer him a show with Ghostland. Instead, Turner asked to produce the record and put it out on his print, Trashy Moped Recordings.

For months, the two lived and breathed the songs. They sent mixes back and forth, collaborating on every aspect of the sound. Drenik’s songs took on new forms – powerful hooks, bottom heavy grooves, and ethereal textures blended effortlessly with drifting, falsetto vocals to create an adventurous mix of post-modern rock and soul that would come to define the record. Synthesizers generate “Touch.” A solitary guitar builds into a wall on “Trouble.” The cosmic call to kill the quiet in “Wire” gives way to the sweet satisfaction of a “Killer High.” Genres coalesce, dividing lines disappear, and Battleme allows the sounds to create their own field of vision. A view from the other side. Songs with no boundaries.

And now Battleme, residing in Portland, OR is figuring out just what to do.
Venue Information:
Cain's Ballroom
423 N Main St.
Tulsa, OK, 74103
http://www.cainsballroom.com