NOTHING MORE

The Stories We Tell Ourselves Tour

NOTHING MORE

The Contortionist, Big Story

Tue Feb 20

Doors: 6:00 pm / Show: 7:00 pm

Cain's Ballroom

Tulsa, OK

$20.00 - $125.00

This event is all ages


Advance $20
Day of Show $22
Door $22

There is a $2 fee that applies to each ticket purchased at the Cain's Box Office.

Thank you for being an American Express® Card Member! Reserve your presale tickets to Nothing More! Tickets available 9/26 at 11am thru 9/28 at 10pm!

Ultimate VIP $125 (ONLINE ONLY)
Meet & Greet $75 (ONLINE ONLY)

Details for the VIP Packages will be listed under the ticket type. You will receive an email with instructions a few days before the event. If you have any questions, before or after your order, please contact info@future-beat.com - Thank You!

No re-entry! No smoking! No refunds!

Support acts are subject to change without notice!

Nothing More
Nothing More
You can’t fake something like Nothing More. Since the band’s inception, they have cultivated a rapturous fanbase the old-fashioned way: By releasing groundbreaking music, tirelessly touring and cultivating a relationship with their fans that transcends trends. Correspondingly, the band’s latest full-length The Stories We Tell Ourselves sees frontman Jonny Hawkins once again bearing the soul of Nothing More as his bandmates Mark Vollelunga (guitar), Daniel Oliver (bass) and Ben Anderson (drums) craft a sonic palette comprised of elements ranging from progressive metal to pop. Ultimately the album isn't just about the band's stories, it's also about the listener's personal narrative.

“Many times there is a disconnect between the stories we tell ourselves about reality and reality itself. That disconnect is a void where suffering and self-frustration often enter our lives.” Hawkins explains. “The Stories We Tell Ourselves is an introspective journey from the first song to the last. Making this album helped me stay tethered to reality as I navigated through challenges in my personal life. I believe it will do the same for others. The title alone was a constant reminder to stay grounded when extreme waves of anxiety, depression, and sadness would try and sweep me into fruitless thought patterns and self-destructive, tail-chasing. For Nothing More, music has always been the source from which we find a positive way to move through challenging emotions… this record is no exception.” Furthermore, the album will be relatable to anyone who needs to look deep inside of themselves and find the strength to carry on in the face of adversity.

The songs on The Stories We Tell Ourselves were written early last year and recorded primarily on the road and in personal studios as production duties were often handled by Hawkins and the band themselves. “We are all very hands-on with the recording, so we decided that making this record on the road, when we were creatively thriving, would be ideal” Vollelunga says. While Hawkins previously wrote and performed most of the band’s drum parts, this is the first album to feature Anderson who joined the band in 2015. “Ben is an incredible drummer and gelled with our musical vision immediately,” Oliver explains. “His talents also freed Jonny up to focus more on the production and melodies and I think that made this album come together in a really fluid way.”

From the relentless groove of “Don’t Stop” to the emotive, anthemic bent of the Pixies-esque “Still In Love,” The Stories We Tell Ourselves proves that confessionals have never been so catchy—and songs like “Let ‘em Burn” seamlessly alternate between aggression and anthemic pop. “‘Just Say When’ is probably the most sentimental song we’ve ever written and it came at a time when I had these overwhelming feelings of frustration about a past failed relationship. I needed an outlet to get it all out,” Hawkins explains. It has been said that the polar emotion to sadness is anger. This is most certainly true as all sentimentality transforms from “Just Say When” into a furious blaze during “Go To War,” which sees Hawkins showcasing his dynamic vocal range over a mix of electronic and organic instrumentation. “Whenever this band has difficult emotions, we turn them into something positive through music. That alchemy is the biggest reason we continue to do what we do,” he says of the cathartic process.

Lyrically the band was further informed by everything from the writings of Carl Jung and C.S. Lewis to the potent psychedelic DMT, the latter of which helped open Hawkins' mind to new ways of understanding himself and the world around him. “‘Funny Little Creatures' is about waking up to the fact that there are these creatures that you have within yourself and that there's often a lot more going on in our subconscious than we consider.” These ideas are mirrored in the artwork which ties directly into the central themes behind The Stories We Tell Ourselves. However, while the content may be heady, the album also features more pop elements than any of the band’s previous albums. Such is the case with the aforementioned “Don’t Stop” which sees the band writing massive hooks that stretch toward the stratosphere. “I think ‘Don’t Stop’ is totally genre-bending for us; we find inspiration in so many different kinds of music and felt it was important to not make rules about what we could or couldn’t do with this record,” says Hawkins. “This album definitely goes to a lot of places that we’ve never been before and I’m really proud of that,” adds Vollelunga.

Then there are the band's live shows which have become legendary for the kinetic energy they share onstage. “We come from a perspective that the live show should be a totally different type of experience than what you hear on the record and we try to show that in every performance,” says Hawkins. It’s clear that this is a band that can't wait to share The Stories We Tell Ourselves, with their fans across the globe.

Ultimately, The Stories We Tell Ourselves proves to all of us that even if our stories don’t always have a happy ending there’s a beauty in their very existence. Even during the album’s darkest moments — Hawkins literally sings about being stuck in a hole on “Still In Love” — there’s a hopefulness that permeates each of these songs that will inevitably resonate with new listeners while making the deep bond that Nothing More has with their fans even deeper.
The Contortionist
The Contortionist
The Contortionist represents fearlessness in musical expression, designed to please artist as much as audience. This band makes progressive metal music, anchored in the heavy sounds that first drew the individual players to the stage, yet unmoored by convention or expectation.

On Clairvoyant, the band’s distinctive fingerprints remain, even as their atmospheric flourishes broaden to encompass ever-richer textures and mine the beauty of simplicity.

For the entirety of their career, The Contortionist has proven capable of being been equally at home on tour with Deftones, Periphery, or Between The Buried And Me, thanks to their dynamic combination of metal’s blunt precision with the adventurous spirit of prog-rock heroes like Rush and King Crimson. The Contortionist integrates seemingly disparate worlds to create their own sound, with a focus on tone, vibe, color, and atmosphere.

The band’s first two records, Exoplanet (2010) and Intrinsic (2012), are monstrously heavy,though no less ambitious than their newer and more expansive creative declarations. The character of The Contortionist’s sound expanded greatly with Language, the 2014 monolithic album that introduced the band’s current lineup of vocalist Michael Lessard, keyboardist Eric Guenther, and bassist Jordan Eberhardt alongside co-founding members Cameron Maynard (guitar) and brothers Robby Baca (guitar) and Joey Baca (drums). In it’s 5/5 review, Substream praised the album as being akin to “a journey through a dream state.” Prog Metal Zone was similarly kind, awarding the album 10/10 and remarking on its propulsive drum rhythms, ambient keyboards, fusion, and “astonishingly inventive flight(s) of musicality.”

Clairvoyant, which reunited the band with producer Jamie King (Between The Buried And Me, Through The Eyes Of The Dead), takes the best elements of The Contortionist’s past and reshapes them as the band follows their individual creative muses toward the future.

The Contortionist ultimately prove to have as much in common with the psychedelic experimentation of later Opeth or Tool and even the textured melodicism of Sigur Ros as they do technical heavy music, but they’ve never sacrificed urgent impact. Critics and fans admire their intelligent approach to the crushing riffs of tech-metal, which becomes more vibrant with elements of ambitious post rock and jazzy / fusion-infused virtuosity. Even when angular riffs, odd time signatures, and devastating breakdowns give way to hypnotic,ethereal, and trancelike musical meditations, The Contortionist are never lacking in total power.

In whatever The Contortionist endeavors to do, there will always be a great amount of thought, attention to detail, and shared love of musicality. They have committed to never surrender to the path of least resistance, always challenging themselves and their audience.

This is art for art’s sake. The Contortionist ease through the doors of perception with grace where possible and smash through the boundaries with absolute force when necessary.
Big Story
Big Story
Big Story is a Dallas, TX based alternative/progressive rock band. The Dallas five-piece has most recently completed production on their debut record, produced by Matt Noveskey of Blue October at Orb Studios in Austin,TX. Big Story is set to join fellow rockers, Seether and Letters from the Fire this summer as part of Seether's 'Poison the Parish' 2017 tour.

When describing their sound, Big Story proudly claims to be "into capturing the impulsive and innovative, while keeping a thoughtful and timeless approach to writing songs."

"Basically, we like to music."
Venue Information:
Cain's Ballroom
423 N Main St.
Tulsa, OK, 74103
http://www.cainsballroom.com