Turnpike Troubadours

Doc Roc Presents NYE with

Turnpike Troubadours

Kaitlin Butts

Mon Dec 31

Doors: 7:30 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

Cain's Ballroom

Tulsa, OK

$50.00 - $65.00

This event is all ages


THERE IS A 4 TICKET LIMIT ON GA, AND 2 TICKET LIMIT IN THE MEZZANINE.  

THE DELIVERY OF TICKETS (BOTH MAIL & EMAIL) WILL BE DELAYED UNTIL DECEMBER 10TH!


Advance $50
Day of Show $55

Mezzanine (21+) $65

There is a $2 fee that applies to each ticket purchased at the Cain's Box Office.

No re-entry! No smoking! No refunds!

Support acts are subject to change without notice!

Turnpike Troubadours
Turnpike Troubadours
Roughly 3,300 people live in Okemah, Oklahoma, a town with vintage redbrick storefronts, a dive bar called the Rocky Road Tavern, a name that means “things up high” in Kickapoo, and a strange track record of birthing great American songwriters: Woody Guthrie is from Okemah. Grammy-nominee John Fullbright is, too. Evan Felker belongs on that list.

“I was born in Okemah but was raised in Wright City, a town in southeastern Oklahoma,” Felker says. “Now I live in Okemah again. The characters I write about are living in that world I grew up in––a bucolic, dirt-underneath-your-fingernails sort of world. People here I grew up are tough. It’s nice to be able to represent them in art.”

Felker is the frontman, cofounder, and primary songwriter for Turnpike Troubadours, a virtuosic band of country-rock road dogs who, on any given night of the week, will play for a much bigger crowd than the populations of Okemah and Wright City combined. Singer/guitarist Felker, fiddler Kyle Nix, steel and electric guitarist Ryan Engleman, bassist RC Edwards, drummer Gabe Pearson, and steel and accordion player Hank Early deliver punch after punch of smart rock-and-roll that sells out huge venues throughout the Midwest and South and packs legendary haunts like the Troubadour in Los Angeles.

With their highly anticipated fourth album A Long Way from Your Heart, the sextet is poised for even bigger breakthroughs. Narratives put to music are nothing new, but Felker and his bandmates have upped the ante, creating a web of unforgettable characters that show up on album after album in songs that are both catchy and musically complex: men and women with their backs against their wall, represented realistically but also imbued with dignity. “It feels like going home to see that those characters are still alive in a way that movies and literary writers have always done,” Felker says of the recurring favorites. “It feels good. There they are, all based on people that I know and love. They’re composite characters based on real people.”

A Long Way from Your Heart was produced by Grammy winner Ryan Hewitt (The Avett Brothers, Flogging Molly, Red Hot Chili Peppers). The result is a rare triumph––an album that hooks immediately but then rewards listeners willing to dig deeper. “I love what we as a band have turned into and how we treat songs,” Felker says. “That’s something we’ve grown into––adding some sort of oddly theatrical element to the musicianship to help the story along, to sum up where or who the character is to give him a little bit of landscape. It’s not just an acoustic guitar and a guy telling you what somebody’s doing.”

The band’s impressive musicianship is multifaceted: fun with time signatures via lapses into double or half time; clean, abrupt stops; stealthy fingerpicking; unassailable grooves. Felker’s warm vocals invite both closer listening and dancing––a tricky mix that he exudes naturally. Unconventional mash-ups work for Felker, who shrugs off attempts to label what he does. “I find art in a lot of places,” he says. “I find things that aren’t considered art in a lot of people’s views of the world artful.”

A Long Way from Your Heart kicks off with a fine example of art in the unexpected. Based on the experience of folks Felker knew back home, “The Housefire” captures the devastation and hope that follows losing just about everything. Cushioned by Irish-inspired strings, the narrator’s gentleness as he loses all he’s built stands tallest. Rolling singalong “Something to Hold On To” begs for one last chance, while the sweetly sad “Old Time Feeling (Like Before)”––which Felker co-wrote with Edwards and friend Jonny Burke––fights falling back into old patterns over a lush chorus of strings led by winsome dobro.

Album standout “Pay No Rent” is an ode to Felker’s aunt Lou, who lived and owned a beloved local bar in Okemah, the Rocky Road Tavern. “She was about the only person I could go drinking with at 10 a.m. on a Tuesday,” Felker says, then laughs. “We got to be really good friends. We’d hang out a lot, fish together, cook together, drink tequila, and build a big-ass fire at her place out on Buckeye Creek. She loved that song ‘Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain.’ She said, ‘If I ever die––I hope I never do, but if I do––you gotta play ‘Blue Eyes Crying in the Rain’ at my funeral.’” Lou passed away last year, and when Felker got the news, he called good friend John Fullbright, and the two got to work learning the song. Then, the day before the funeral, the two realized Lou had asked about five other people to sing “Blue Eyes,” too. “So between noon and three in the morning, we wrote ‘Pay No Rent’ for her instead and played that,” Felker explains, laughing again. Based on an old Irish saying, the song is a gorgeous tribute.

Felker’s favorite album track, “Unrung” is a winning amble through warnings, praise, and a tinge of jealousy, all written about a good friend. “A Tornado Warning”––Felker’s other favorite––is a love song brimming with detail. Frenetic story song “The Winding Star Mountain Blues” traces the strained friendship between a stand-up guy and his wayward childhood friend to immortalize a different kind of heartbreak. Electric shuffler “The Hard Way” is a wry send-up of trying to relive youth when it’s a little too late.

Featuring nimble piano and Haggard-worthy jazz guitar licks, album closer “Sunday Morning Paper” is a nugget of hero-worshipping wit. Felker was inspired to write the song by his uncle, Ervin Felker. “He gave me my first guitar. He played in bands and was a Marine–– he’s the guy from ‘Blue Star,’” Felker says, referencing a track from the band’s 2012 release Goodbye Normal Street. Felker took the first line from one of his uncle’s songs then penned the rest to create a celebration of the giants of 70s country-rock––the elder Felker included.

The album’s sharply drawn characters and the range of challenges they face creates a tapestry that’s compelling and ultimately, inspiring. “This whole record is about resilience in the face of tragedy––tragedies of different sizes,” Felker says. “Just getting your nose down and dealing with it.”
Kaitlin Butts
Kaitlin Butts
Her self-proclaimed “mess” of curly red hair, and an Oklahoma-sunshine-bright smile capture attention the moment she steps on the stage. A declaration that “we’re gonna get to know each other real quick” followed by an ornery grin hints that there are stories to be told. And tell them she does, with a sound that is both fresh and original, and rich in the traditions of country music.

She tells stories about love and fun, and the joy of finding contentment exactly where you are. But, as in life, there are other stories to be told as well. She sings these songs with 50 years of heartbreak in her voice, though she is not even half that age. Her delivery is refreshingly uncontrived which is a welcome relief for those who crave the honesty and sincerity that seems to be missing from some of today’s country music. And her sometimes colorful banter keeps audiences smiling.

“Her demeanor and voice match the gentle rolling hills of Oklahoma she was raised in, though it can crack and scold just the same as the violent storms that roll across those same plains.” -Red Dirt Nation

Her debut album, Same Hell, Different Devil is the result of taking these stories down the Red-Dirt rabbit hole known as the Boohatch Studios, with legendary Red Dirt Oklahoma artist and producer, Mike McClure, and a strong showing of Oklahoma musicians who helped the 10 original songs written by Butts, along with a cover of “Gods Gonna Cut You Down” take final form.

“Same Hell, Different Devil serves as a showcase to this young ladies incredible songwriting skill and powerful vocal prowess. Exhibiting a maturity in her lyrics well beyond …her age, so many of the songs on this album will certainly leave listeners wondering which of the ghosts of songwriters past this girl has tapped into.” -Red Dirt, Blue Collar

Summer 2016 Kaitlin was awarded Best in Country for the Oklahoma Gazette AwardsTexas radio has taken notice of the music from this release, and in 2016 Kaitlin was awarded 2016 New Female Vocalist of the Year for the Texas Regional Radio Music Awards.

“The Oklahoma native has a music library of songs that are simple, exciting, and storyful. She’s honest, and she’s really good.” -Buddy Logan-Radio Texas Live/KNUE

The success of Same Hell, Different Devil has given Kaitlin the opportunity to play some of her favorite stages, both supporting her favorite artists and headlining, as well as joining several festival lineups. Gruene Hall with Kelly Willis and Bruce Robison, Fort Worth’s Live Oak with Courtney Patton and Jason Eady, Dosey Doe with Parker McCollum, OKC Myriad Gardens with John Fullbright, Cheatham Street Warehouse, Blue Light Live. She has also supported Aaron Watson, Wade Bowen, Bart Crow, and Zane Williams. She has enjoyed playing Texas Red Dirt Radio Show (TXRDR) several times hosted by Justin Frazell.

A musical friendship with Lubbock artist Dalton Domino led to an opportunity to perform on Lubbock band, Flatland Cavalry’s debut album, Humble Folks, featured on their song “A Life Where We Work Out” which debuted at #2 on iTunes.

Fall 2016 has some great things in store, such as 95.9 The Ranch’s Ranch Bash, Josh Abbott Fest, Turnpike Troubadour/Jason Boland produced Medicine Stone Festival, Larry Joe Taylor’s Rhymes and Vines. In December of 2016, she’ll be heading to Ireland for the Red Dirt Pub Crawl, featuring Shane Smith and the Saints, Flatland Cavalry’s Cleto Cordero, Rich O’Toole and many more. 2016 is going to come to an end with a bang as she, along with Flatland Cavalry, ring in the New Year on the historic Cain’s Ballroom stage with the Turnpike Troubadours. Catch her out on the roads of Oklahoma, Texas, and beyond along with her beloved road dog (and star of her “Gal Like Me” live video) Hank, happily riding shotgun.
Venue Information:
Cain's Ballroom
423 N Main St.
Tulsa, OK, 74103
http://www.cainsballroom.com