Hangover Ball 2019

Doc Roc Presents

Hangover Ball 2019

Cody Canada, Jason Boland, William Clark Green, Wade Bowen, Jamie Lin Wilson, Nikki Lane, Jonathan Tyler, Mike McClure, BJ Barham, Evan Felker

Tue Jan 01

Doors: 6:30 pm / Show: 7:30 pm

Cain's Ballroom

Tulsa, OK

$22.00 - $42.00

This event is all ages


Advance $22

Day of Show $25
Door $25
Mezzanine (21+) $42

There is a $2 fee that applies to each ticket purchased at the Cain's Box Office.

No re-entry! No smoking! No refunds!

Performers are subject to change without notice!

Cody Canada
Cody Canada
Cody Canada was 16 years old when he made his way from Yukon to Stillwater, Oklahoma. He had been searching for some inspiration; a place to call home musically. What he found was a creative nirvana of musicians who were generating the music that would stay with him for the rest of his life. "It was like the greatest place on earth, " Cody recalls. "I met Tom Skinner, Scott Evans, Bob Childers, Jimmy LaFave, the Red Dirt Rangers and they were all playing this really, really good music. It was kind of in that same vibe as the Allman Brothers and The Band. But what came out of it was really diverse. There were more country acts like Jason Boland. The All American Rejects were the rock guys. Then you had the whole Red Dirt hippie thing…I didn't even know what Red Dirt was until somebody told me. I got turned on to it all and it's stayed with me ever since."

During the 15 years that Canada was front man for Cross Canadian Ragweed, he successfully tapped into those influences on each of their nine albums. Four of those nine charted on Billboard's Top 10 Country Albums over the course of the years, thousands of albums were sold and the band played to sell out crowds across the country helping to spread "red dirt" music. But the one thing that Canada wanted to do in honor of his musical heartland never came to fruition…until now.

In the wake of Cross Canadian Ragweed's decision to part ways, Cody resurfaced with an armament of musicians and a mission in mind. With his long time Ragweed band mate, Jeremy Plato (bass) the two made a seamless transition into the world of The Departed, as in 'Cody Canada and The Departed". "We kicked around several ideas for names," Canada said. "We're all from different bands and we wanted something to sound like we came from different places. The Departed was right on the money." Along with Canada and Plato, The Departed rounds out with Seth James on guitar (Seth James Band, Ray Wylie Hubbard), Steve Littleton on B3 organ and keys (Live Oak Decline, Stoney LaRue & the Arsenals, Medicine Show) and Dave Bowen on drums (Stoney LaRue, Bleu Edmondson, Dale Watson).

Because they have traveled in the same circles for years, the band members are all familiar with each other and familiar with each other's style of playing. More than likely they've all played on the same stage at one time or another already. It's this familiarity with each other that made their first project so uncomplicated. Although The Departed is writing and will record original material, the band's first priority was getting into the studio and cutting the Oklahoma tribute album that Cody had been wanting to do for years. The result is This Is Indian Land, The Departed's debut album set for release this spring.

This Is Indian Land is a 15-track deep "buffet of really kick-ass Okie songs," Canada states. He jokingly says "It might sound like originals because not many people have ever heard these songs". But in fact, the album is loaded with well-known selections like Kevin Welch's "Kickin' Back in Amsterdam" and "True Love Never Dies", JJ Cale's "If You're Ever in Oklahoma" and Rock and Roll Hall-of-Famer Leon Russell's "Home Sweet Oklahoma".

Of course there were a few tracks picked for more personal reasons. Cody notes, "'The Ballad of Rosalie' (Randy Pease) was the first song I ever heard in Stillwater. 'Little Rain Will Do' (Greg Jacobs) is just an awesome historical song I've been wanting to record since the first time I heard it. Randy Crouch's 'Face On Mars' really kind of frightened us. A lot of people wanted us to do it but we didn't know what to do with it. We sat there for a whole day trying to get it arranged and find a groove for it. We made it happen and it's one of my favorites on the album".

This Is Indian Land was recorded at Yellow Dog Studios in Austin, TX. As if the album content and inspiration weren't Oklahoma enough for The Departed, Yellow Dog Studios and owner Dave Percefull got their start in Tulsa. "It really kind of tied it all together," Cody says. "I walked in and saw all the pictures of these Stillwater guys hanging on the wall and thought 'Man, this is exactly where this album needs to be cut".

Cody Canada & The Departed is already making waves on the road. With the recording of the album behind them and a brand new year in front, the band has hit the road like only professionals know how to do. As excited as they are about their gigs, they are taking it all very seriously. "It's funny because with Ragweed we got to a point where we didn't have to practice. We were playing so many shows we could just get up there and do the tunes, right? Well now it's a new band playing new songs so we've got to learn everything, get our game together and practice. It's a whole lot of fun. I can't sleep at night. It keeps me awake, not from worry but from excitement. We're just ready to tear it up."
Jason Boland
Jason Boland
Jason Boland & the Stragglers are an American Texas Country/Red Dirt group featuring Harrah, Oklahoma native Jason Boland (lead vocalist, guitar), Roger Ray (pedal steel, lead/rhythm guitar), Brad Rice (drums/backing vocals), and Grant Tracy (bass). Additional record contributions are made by Noah Jeffries on banjo, mandolin, and guitar.

Jason Boland and Brad Rice are both members of the Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity.

The Bourbon Legend was released on Bruce Robison's Sustain Records label in late 2006. In 2007 Jason Boland co-produced the album Choices for the band Hazzard. The band's front man, Dana Hazzard, was the original fiddle player for the Stragglers.

In 2008, just before the release of the album, Comal County Blue, Boland ruptured a vocal chord. The injury almost caused him to lose his singing voice for good, but after surgery and resting his voice, he prevailed.

According to Katie Key, editor of the Texas Music Chart, "Comal County Blue" is the fastest growing single in 2008 from an independent label.

On April 20, 2010, the band released their second live album, entitled High in the Rockies: A Live Album. The recordings come from four live concerts over four days from January 7, 2010 to January 10, 2010. The shows were performed in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, Ft. Collins, Colorado, Laramie, Wyoming, and Denver, Colorado, respectively.
William Clark Green
William Clark Green
William Clark Green Is not one for pulling punches. Where some songwriters trade in subtlety and dancing around blunt truths with clever feints and metaphor, Clark aims his words straight to the point and, when needed, right through the heart. His music is unrelentingly direct and hard-hitting, too, charged with a palpable rock ’n’ roll immediacy that’s as evident in his most intimate solo acoustic performances as it is in the full-tilt band shows that have packed rooms across his native Lone Star State from the Blue Light in Lubbock to the world’s biggest honkytonk, Billy Bob’s Texas in Fort Worth. And with the April 21st release of Ringling Road, his eagerly awaited fourth album, Green is set to make his biggest impact on the booming Texas/Red Dirt music scene — and beyond — yet.

But just don’t call him the “Next Big Thing,” because as Green makes patently clear on Ringling Road’s riotously myth-busting opening track, that’s a laugh, buddy. And even with tongue firmly in cheek, William Clark Green is only interested in being real.

“Oh it’s hard to pay your dues when there ain’t no money in the bank
It’s a shame I gotta make it to the show but there ain’t no gas in the tank
It’s insane what you do for a broken heart and some busted strings
And everybody saying I’m the next big thing!”

“I’m actually a little nervous about what people are going to think of that song, and if they’ll think I’m being an asshole,” Clark admits with a laugh. “And that’s not the case at all, because it’s actually sarcastic as hell. But we’ve been hearing that ‘you’re the next big thing’ thing for a long time now — and I’m guilty of saying the same to some of my songwriter friends who are struggling out there, too. And even though it’s always meant in a nice way, you can’t help but think, ‘What? I have no idea what you’re talking about. I’m actually sleeping in my truck tonight!”

Not that he’s complaining. Green is nothing if not fully committed to his chosen path. Granted, had a few chips fallen a little differently, he could have just as easily — and happily — devoted his life to ranching, but fate dictated pretty early on that he was meant to be a troubadour. He may have started taking guitar lessons at 13 primarily out of boredom — his family had just moved from Flint, Texas to College Station in the summer, and he didn’t have any new school friends yet — but it wasn’t long before he developed a keen interest in songwriting. A healthy obsession with his father’s copy of Willis Alan Ramsay’s classic 1972 debut had a lot to do with that (“That’s still the best album I’ve ever heard, and the reason I use three names,” Green enthuses). So did timing: “I remember seeing Robert Earl Keen and Pat Green and even Jerry Jeff Walker at the Wolf Pen Creek Amphitheater in College Station when I was in high school,” he says. “The scene was really kind of in its birth then, and I was right there in the middle, paying attention and really intrigued by all of it.”

College originally wasn’t part of his game plan — “I was a very poor student, and I still wanted to be a cowboy” — but after a lead on a ranch-hand job fell through and a miserable two-week stint at a feed lot scared him straight, Green enrolled in junior college and eventually found his way to Texas Tech. He majored in agriculture economics, but spent more time songwriting and playing guitar at every open-mic night and hotel bar gig he could find than actually studying. By the time fellow Red Raider and Texas country rising star Josh Abbott handed him the keys to his Tuesday-night residency at the Blue Light, Green and his own band were on their way.

“That’s when things got really serious for me,” Green recalls. “I came out with my first record [2008’s Dangerous Man], and it kind of got to the point where I knew if I was going to pursue music, I’d have to give it everything I had, because there’s just no room for half-assing it in this business. School went to the wayside — I ended up graduating, but it took six years because music was my priority. And here I am now at 28 — about to release our fourth album and hoping to get to five before I’m 30. That’ll be a pretty quick turn around, but that’s the goal.”

The aforementioned “next big thing” rumors started up in the wake of his second album, 2010’s Misunderstood, but it was 2013’s Rose Queen that proved his real breakthrough. Green recorded the album, produced by Rachel Loy in Nashville, at a real crossroads in his career — with momentum and high expectations at his back but barely enough money in the bank to foot the bill (and that only after a desperate call for help to angel investor Wade Bowen saved the day). “It was a huge leap of faith,” Green says today, “but I told the band, ‘We’re going to pull out all the stops, and we’re going to find a way to make exactly the record we want to make and need to make.” The end result was a triumph, yielding Green’s first three top-10 Texas Radio hits, including two chart-toppers in “She Likes the Beatles” and “Hanging Around” (the former also won “Song of the Year” honors at the fan-voted Lone Star Music Awards).

Of course, all of that set the bar even higher for the follow-up — and Ringling Road delivers in spades. Returning to Nashville to team once again with Loy (Green calls working with the gifted up-and-coming producer “the best decision I’ve ever made in my musical career”), the band overcame a a couple of early setbacks — longtime drummer Jay Saldana had recently left for a new gig with Wade Bowen, followed by guitarist Steve Marcus breaking his arm a week before they went into the studio — to come through like champs under pressure. Saldana ended up coming back as a guest to drum on most of the record (along with new band member Ryan Garza), while the lead guitars duties were initially shared between Nashville session vet Kenny Greenberg and band friend Josh Serrato, recruited out of fellow Texas band Six Market Boulevard for what originally supposed to be “fill-in” duty. By the time Marcus’ arm healed up enough for him to join the sessions halfway through, though, Serrato had been promoted from temp to full-time band member. Greenberg ended up staying on for the rest of the record as well.

“All three of those guys are monster talents on guitar, so It was a really incredible experience to have them all working with each other in the studio,” Green marvels. “It all just happened the way it was supposed to, and we weren’t going to get in the way of that!”

With that formidable triple-guitar threat augmented by Green on acoustic, seasoned band member Cameron Moreland on bass and key assists from Loy and others on background vocals and a few other instrumental tracks, it’s no wonder that Ringling Road boasts the fullest sound of any WCG album to date. But as has been the case since day one of Green’s career, it’s the quality of his songs that ultimately makes the boldest statement. And it’s not just the flatout rockers (“Next Big Thing”) and irresistibly catchy, up-tempo numbers (“Sticks and Stones,” “Creek Don’t Rise,” “Going Home”) that hit hard, either. Other highlights include “Old Fashioned,” a stirring elegy for a bygone Texas (“The interstate’s pumping just like a vein full of California license plates”), and the uproarious, Todd Snider-worthy title track, which takes its name from a real road in Green’s current hometown of Eastland, Texas. Back in the day, the Ringling Bros. Circus used Eastland as a regular resting stop between shows, where the elephants and other animals were let off the train for a drink and the myriad circus folk would unwind and do whatever circus folk usually do on their nights off. As colorfully imagined by Green and co-writers Ross Cooper and Randal Clay, that was a helluva lot more wild and entertaining than the actual ticketed performances.

“Ross is a good friend of mine from Lubbock, and Randal is a guy he met in Nashville who was actually a roustabout for 10 years,” Green explains. “I mean, what better way to write a song about the circus than to write it with a guy like that? Randal brought in a lot of truths about what really does happen behind the scenes in the circus. To be honest, after I told them about Eastland and the history of Ringling Road, he and Ross just got going on this tangent that was so good, I kind of just sat back and was like, ‘keep going!’”

“Ringling Road,” the song, may be a freak-show blast, but the rest of the album is hardly all fun and circus games. “Final This Time” is a devastatingly frank post-mortem of a divorce Green witnessed between two close friends. “Fool Me Once” and “Hey Sarah,” two of the three songs (along with “Sticks and Stones”) that Green wrote solo, are unflinching accounts of his own firsthand experiences at bad (or at least uncertain) love. And the lead single “Sympathy” (already a No. 1 on Texas radio) offers anything but sympathy to a former lover looking for a shoulder to cry on.

Most brutal of all, though, is the hauntingly plaintive “Still Think About You,” in which the kind of sympathy Green does offer an ex comes laced with painfully bitter honesty: “Sorry that you fell in love with someone you could never inspire …”

“You know, it’s not that I’m an asshole,” Green says again, laughing. “But I feel like everybody has those selfish feelings sometimes, but they’re never said in songs. I actually showed that song — I had the chorus written but still needed the verses — to Randy Rogers and Sean McConnell, and they both went, ‘oh, that’s not my style.’ And I thought, ‘Well, maybe this is a terrible idea …’”

Before giving up on it, though, Green showed it to one other trusted friend: Kent Finlay, songwriter’s songwriter, founder of the legendary Cheatham Street Warehouse in San Marcos, Texas, and, not for nothing, Green’s co-writer on Rose Queen’s hit single “Hanging Around.” Sage soul that he was, Finlay — who sadly passed away on March 2, 2015 after a long illness — took a shine to the unfinished song at first pitch.

“I took it to Kent and said, ‘I’ve got this song, and no one seems to like it,’” Green recalls. “But I played what I had for him, and he went, ‘Oh, I like that!’ And I was like, ‘Thank God, finally somebody does!’ So we ended up finishing it together, and I’m really glad we did.

“Taking uncomfortable feelings like that and putting them to paper and writing songs about them — that’s kind of been my staple, really,” Green continues. “And that song is about as true as it gets.”

He pauses on that thought for a moment. “Now, I don’t know if that’s a good thing or a bad thing,” he adds with a laugh, “but I guess the truth prevails! And that makes me able to sleep at night.”
Wade Bowen
Wade Bowen
Ask Wade Bowen what distinguishes his music, and after mulling the notion for a minute, his answer is basic and direct: “Intensity.” That’s because Bowen sings and writes with passion and fervent commitment about the matters that count in life with a depth of thought and palpable emotionality that hits listeners where they live and feel. And that fervor is matched by rich melodies and lyrical and musical hooks that grab the ears and imagination and don’t let go.

It’s a talent that’s made Bowen a leading light on the thriving Texas music scene and launched him into realms beyond with a sound built upon a rock-solid country foundation that also draws inspiration from the wide spectrum of music he loves, be it rockers like Led Zeppelin and Aerosmith or critically-acclaimed roots singer-songwriters like Patty Griffin and Paul Thorn or his personal musical icon Bruce Springsteen. And now with If We Ever Make It Home, Bowen delivers a tour de force collection of songs of inspiration, hope and deep feeling.
If We Ever Make It Home begins with an upbeat twist on the heartbreak song on “You Had Me At My Best,” the album’s first single. A bracing as well as touching positivism informs such songs of abiding love and emotional support as “Turn On The Lights” and “From Bad To Good,” both of them drawing from Wade and his wife Shelby’s struggle to overcome her postpartum depression. The haunting “Ghost In This Town” and the rocking “Nobody’s Fool” and the bright nightlife lights of “Missing You” offer prescriptions for overcoming departed lovers and heartache while “Trouble” and “Daddy and the Devil” offer cautionary tales about life’s temptations. The sweet first kiss of “Why Makes Perfect Sense” brings out Bowen’s romanticism, and the title track and “Somewhere Beautiful” cap the set with transcendent song prayers for peace and happiness. As its title implies, If We Ever Make It Home is a lyrical and musical journey that is as fulfilling as the end result of the destination.

“My last album, Lost Hotel, was about soul searching and finding a new direction in my life,” Bowen explains. “This record is about being happy with your life, even within all that’s going on inside and around us. It reflects my hope that there’s a better future for us all and finding a better place, a peaceful place, while the world seems as if it’s going in the other direction. It’s not a record you can listen to once and get everything it’s about.” On it, Bowen collaborates with writers like hit-maker Jim Beavers and fellow Texans Radney Foster and Randy Rogers and also ropes in numbers written by some of his favorite fellow songwriters.

Produced by J.R. Rodriguez, If We Ever Make It Home matches Bowen’s strongest set of songs yet with musical contributions by guitar stars David Grissom (known for his work with John Mellencamp and Joe Ely) and Jedd Hughes and such Music City A-plus team session players as Tom Bukovac, Kenny Greenburg, Dan Dugmore and Aubrey Haynie, as well as guest vocal appearances by acclaimed singer-songwriters Ashley Monroe on the title cut and Chris Knight on “Daddy and the Devil.” It’s music that enriches the lives and souls of those who hear it as much as it does for its creator, providing a perfect soundtrack for both Saturday night out on the town delight and Sunday morning contemplation and reflection.

Born and raised in Waco, Texas in a family that loves music, Wade Bowen’s creative imagination was captured early on by his father’s Guy Clark albums as well as his mother’s love for Elvis Presley and the mainstream country music that his sisters enjoyed. Although he wrote poetry and prose from an early age and was always singing to himself, it was sports that dominated his high school years: football, baseball, track, golf and swimming, “everything that they would let me play,” he recalls.

Given his first guitar at age nine, Bowen finally picked it up in earnest at 17 when the depth of Guy Clark’s songwriting and the work of rising Texas star Robert Earl Keen “hit me like a brick in the face.” From then on his guitar became his new best friend, and he immediately began writing his own songs. Once he hit college at Texas Tech University to study marketing, it was only natural that he followed “the old school rule of rock’n’roll — get some friends together and start a band,” as he puts it. The resulting group — dubbed West 84 for the highway Bowen traveled between home in Waco and school in Lubbock — were soon packing his fellow students into the bars, thanks to the appeal of his budding songwriting talents. By the time Bowen graduated, his band matriculated into the booming Texas music movement and quickly repeated their success across the Lone Star State.

Eventually becoming known under the banner of his own name, Bowen eschewed grabbing for the brass ring of stardom to instead build an enduring relationship with his listeners by playing some 250 shows a year, which he continues to do today. “It seemed to make much more sense and be so much more fun to me to have some success by playing on the road. It’s such a great way to do it and it shows you every aspect of a career,” he notes. “I’m a big fan of Bruce Springsteen and how he did it before he became nationally known. It’s fun to build it from ground zero and watch it grow.”

His self-released 2002 album Try Not To Listen consolidated his Texas success as its title tune went Top 10 on the Texas Music Chart. The statewide sensation generated by his live shows led the following year to The Blue Light Live, an in-concert album that spent most of the next two plus years as a Top 10 selling disc on LoneStarMusic.com, the leading online retailer in the Texas music scene. Earning Album of the Year and Male Vocalist of the Year honors in 2004 from MyTexasMusic.com, Bowen’s burgeoning success won him a deal with Sustain Records.

With Lost Hotel in 2006, the groundswell Bowen had stroked in the Lone Star State took his single “God Bless This Town” to the top of the Texas Music Chart while its video was a Top 20 debut on CMT and spent several weeks at #1 on CMT’s Pure Country 12 Pack countdown in the company of such stars as Alan Jackson and Brad Paisley. The vibrant buzz he had started in Texas also spread further as he hit the national road on the Lee Ann Womack and Friends tour and expanded his fan base for his live appearances into the Midwest and Southeast.

Bowen’s prowess as a songwriter led to co-writing “Don’t Break My Heart Again” with Pat Green, the lead single from Green’s Top 10 Lucky Ones album, and “When It All Goes Down” with his brother-in-law Cody Canada of Cross Canadian Ragweed on the band’s Garage album. He has also collaborated as a writer with Texas legend Ray Wylie Hubbard — who made a cameo appearance in Bowen’s “God Bless The Town” video — and Nashville-based Texpatriate Radney Foster as well as such fellow rising stars on the Lone Star music scene as Randy Rogers, Brandon Rhyder and Bleu Edmondson. His writing talents also recently won Bowen a publishing deal with Sea Gayle Music.

Living on the cusp of the Texas Hill Country in New Braunfels and now the father of two sons, Bowen is determined to stick to his guns and create music with meaning and continue to sharpen his aim for getting to the heart of any matter that inspires him personally and creatively. “I feel like what I am good at is taking something that’s in my head or that I want to write about and creating music that means something to people,” he explains. “I like for everything to not be taken for granted. But I’m also not always serious, and when I play live, I want the audience to have as good a time as I do making music for them.”

And it’s all a lifelong endeavor that’s embedded in Bowen’s heart. “I just keep doing what I am doing and stick to it,” he concludes. And in the process he brings us all back home alongside him.
Jamie Lin Wilson
Jamie Lin Wilson
When describing Jamie Wilson's voice, two aspects come to mind: that honeyed tenor twang that's become known as one of the sweetest instruments in modern folk music, and that poignant, poetic, down-to-earth point of view she brings to her songwriting. The spotlight shines brighter than ever on both with Holidays & Wedding Rings, her May 2015 release. Even fans may be surprised to realize it’s the first full-length solo album from one of brightest and busiest stars in her recent years amid the folk/Americana/independent country music scene.

An artist of singular talent and restless creativity, she broke into the Texas country/folk scene as one of the co-lead vocalists of the Gougers before the band gradually gave way to not only Wilson's solo work (the fine EP "Dirty Blonde Hair" was released in 2010) but also higher-profile musical adventures with The Trishas, an all-female singer-songwriter band that has toured through some of the state and nation's best venues. Scoring one of the best albums of 2012 with "High Wide & Handsome,” the Trishas lit up the genre for a few years while always leaving Wilson room for solo gigs, guest spots on over a dozen albums by now, and song-swaps with like-minded artists all over Texas and beyond.

Both deeply personal and solidly collaborative, Holidays & Wedding Rings is an evident labor of love from the sort of songwriter who can delve into the sweetness of family life without hitting sap. Someone who can dig into heartache without wallowing in it, go slow and subtle and still leave a listener rapt. Someone who can share the spotlight with top-flight musicians: veteran Texas music hands John Ross Silva, Scott Davis, Cody Foote and Reckless Kelly’s David Abeyta are all in the mix here, along with alt-country star Wade Bowen on a spine-tingling duet/co-write. Wilson’s home life as a wife and mom come through often in her music (and are known to many of her fans through her humorous social media profiles) but creatively, she can portray lonesome and restless with the best of them.

Multiple approaches, countless gigs, several years and nearly a million miles into what promises to be a grand career, Jamie Wilson not only runs with a good crowd: she never fails to stand out.
Nikki Lane
Nikki Lane
Nikki Lane’s stunning third album Highway Queen, out February 17th, 2017, sees the young Nashville singer emerge as one of country and rock’s most gifted songwriters. Co-produced by Lane and fellow singer-songwriter, Jonathan Tyler, this emotional tour-de-force was recorded at Matt Pence’s Echo Lab studio in Denton, Texas as well as at Club Roar with Collin Dupuis in Nashville, Tennessee. Blending potent lyrics, unbridled blues guitars and vintage Sixties country-pop swagger, Lane’s new music will resonate as easily with Lana Del Rey and Jenny Lewis fans as those of Neil Young and Tom Petty.

Highway Queen is a journey through heartbreak that takes exquisite turns. The record begins with a whiskey-soaked homage to Lane’s hometown (“700,000 Rednecks”) and ends on the profoundly raw “Forever Lasts Forever,” where Lane mourns a failed marriage – the “lighter shade of skin” left behind from her wedding ring. On “Forever” and the confessional “Muddy Waters,” Lane’s lyrics align her with perceptive songwriters like Nick Lowe and Cass McCombs. Elsewhere, “Companion” is pure Everly Brothers’ dreaminess (“I would spend a lifetime/ Playing catch you if I can”). She goes on a Vegas bender on the rollicking “Jackpot,” fights last-call blues (“Foolish Heart”) and tosses off brazen one-liners at a backroom piano (“Big Mouth”).

“Love is the most unavoidable thing in the world,” Lane says. “The person you pick could be half set-up to destroy your life with their own habits – I’ve certainly experienced that before and taken way too long to get out of that mistake.”

In 2014, Lane’s second album All or Nothin’ (New West) solidified her sandpaper voice beneath a ten-gallon hat as the new sound and look of outlaw country music. Produced by Dan Auerbach, the record’s bluesy Western guitars paired with Lane’s Dusty Springfield-esque voice earned glowing reviews from NPR, the Guardian and Rolling Stone. In three years since her Walk of Shame debut, Lane said she was living most of the year on the road.

Growing up, Lane used to watch her father pave asphalt during blistering South Carolina summers. She’d sit on the roller (“what helps smooth out the asphalt”) next to a guy named Rooster and divvy out Hardee’s lunch orders for the workers. “My father thought he was a country singer,” Lane laughs. “He partied hard at night, but by 6:30 AM he was out on the roads in 100-degree weather.” That’s the southern work ethic, she says. “We didn’t have a lot of money, but I was privileged with the knowledge of how to work hard, how to learn and to succeed when things aren’t set up for me.” Creativity was an unthinkable luxury, she adds. “When people told me I should try to get a record deal for songs I was writing, I was like, ‘that’s cute – I’ve got to be at work at 10 A.M.’”

“Becoming a songwriter is one of the most selfish things I’ve ever done,” Lane says plainly. She describes writing her first song at age 25 like it was a necessary act of self-preservation after a devastating breakup. Many of her early songs, she said on Shame and Nothin’, were about the fleetingness of relationships she believed were permanent, she says. Lane’s main line of work in those days was a fashion entrepreneur (she’s currently the owner of Nashville’s vintage clothing boutique High Class Hillbilly). It brought her to cities around the country, New York to Los Angeles to Nashville. And like a true wanderer, Lane’s sound crisscrosses musical genres with ease, while the lonesome romantic in her remains. Even a soft song like, “Send The Sun,” with its lilting downward strum, is flush with bittersweet emotion. “Darling, we’re staring at the same moon,” Lane sings lovingly. “I used to say that to my ex,” she says with cheerful stoicism, “to try to brighten the long nights, stay positive.”

Highway Queen is poised to be Lane’s mainstream breakthrough. “Am I excited to spend years of my life in a van, away from family and friends? No, but I’m excited to share my songs, so they’ll reach people and help them get through whatever they’re going through. To me, that’s worth it.”

“Lay You Down” is one of those unexpected moments for Lane. “That song was inspired by something Levon Helm’s wife posted on Facebook when he was sick with cancer,” Lane says. “I was just so moved by her telling the world how much love he felt from people writing to them, and moved that because of the Internet, I was able to see that love ­– even from a distance.” The song became surreal for Lane and her band when her longtime guitarist, Alex Munoz, was diagnosed with cancer while they were playing it. “It deepened my perspective and the importance of keeping everyone safe,” says Lane.

On the record cover, Lane looks out on wide, unowned Texan plains, leaning on the fearsome horns of a massive steer. Wearing a vintage Victorian dress, the stark photo invokes a time before highways existed. The symbolism isn’t lost on Lane. Highway Queen was a pioneering moment for her as an artist.

“I was always a smart girl, always had to yell to be heard,” she says, “But this was the first time in my career where I decided how things were going to go; I was willing to take the heat.” Lane included the bonus track “Champion” as a small testament to that empowerment. “It makes a point,” Lane says with a smile, “That I appreciate what you’re saying, but get the fuck out of my way.”
Jonathan Tyler
Jonathan Tyler
Solo artist as well as frontman for Jonathan Tyler & The Northern Lights (or JTNL), Jonathan has racked up a huge number of "best"s — best male vocalist, best group — while playing major festivals all over the country, from SXSW to Bonnaroo to Summerfest. He performed on Jimmy Kimmel Live! in 2010. Based in Dallas for many years, Jonathan has recently relocated to Los Angeles.

"Heavily influenced by The Black Crowes, Led Zeppelin, and The Rolling Stones, JTNL breathes new life into classic rock n' roll with confident swagger and bright energy. There's something spiritual about being part of a JTNL show — something that stays with you long after the smell of smoke has left your clothes and the lyrics have left your memory … " - Lauren Strange, No Country For New Nashville
Mike McClure
Mike McClure
Mike McClure writes songs. He's written a whole lot of them. So many that he probably doesn't remember how all of them go. His songs are so good that other people like to sing them. Super famous people. Mike McClure has a band. There are four of them. They have instruments and they play them. They also have a van they ride around in. Mike also makes records. He's made a lot of them. He also makes records for other people. You've probably heard some of them. Mike also likes swords and looking at weird things in antique stores. He raises ducks and geese or some kind of bird. He also raises kids. Life is funny and Mike McClure laughs at it.
BJ Barham
BJ Barham
Raleigh, NC – In the business of music, many are called and many may try, but few cross the threshold of being able to say they are truly committed for the long haul. With the release of their latest studio album, Burn.Flicker.Die., American Aquarium is proving that they have graduated to that class of professional musicians that have made an undeniable commitment to their music and their fans.

American Aquarium's six years as a band have been a fast-moving blur of rubber on road, touring coast to coast through the states and Europe. Most nights of the year are spent far from their Raleigh homes, squinting out from bright stages at a growing legion of passionate fans who've followed them through the release of six albums that reflect a whirlwind of too many whiskey soaked nights, nameless women in smoky bars and fast living while your youth is in full bloom. But what happens when it all stops feeling good?

Burn.Flicker.Die. is what has emerged from that scenario for this group of hard working players. After two years of writing, they journeyed to the legendary recording hub which gave birth to some of the greatest blues, country and rock records of all time: Muscle Shoals/Sheffield, AL. Recorded in eight days under the precise hand of friend/tour buddy Jason Isbell, the record is an aptly named milestone for the band, and their most painstaking effort to date. As a long-time Southern rock artisan, Isbell provided a weathered know-how in producing the record American Aquarium is proudest of. Described as a "consequence record" by vocalist BJ Barham, the band spent that week pushing out everything that's been haunting them: working for six years, watching buzz bands peak and die, and pining for their own payoff.

"I wish my addictions didn't mean so much/but we all can't be born with that kind of luck," Barham sings on the title track, capturing the fast lifestyle with images of subtle barroom horrors: Finding a high in a dingy bathroom stall, a pretty barfly from somewhere down south you won't see again, free shots you can't say no to. "Casualties" is a soaring, chorus-less ode to death by rock that confronts age and the band's great fear of having made the wrong choice. They've watched artists ride the hype train right off the track. But that can't be American Aquarium – they've been laying low too long, finding their way to the most poignant album of their careers through hard touring and waking up to realize that it's not Saturday night anymore.

Some of the record hurts to hear, like the quiet, fine-spun "Harmless Sparks." It sounds like the flicker of a solitary cigarette burning to its filter in the blue-black glow of a bar. Keys plink like shot glasses in the background, and you're the last to go home. American Aquarium has been there before. But the record also looks to the end of a hard road, where there might be validation for good music, and even love. In "Jacksonville," Barham promises someone a call if he "makes it out alive." Taking a cue from Ryan Adams, he draws romance out of shame in "Northern Lights." And in "Saturday Nights" and "Saint Mary's," he makes a subtle mockery of the dives they know too well – slick with spilled whiskey and crawling with restless women who all look the same.

Every grizzled image of Burn.Flicker.Die is real, which comes from the band's profound understanding of small southern town debauchery and six years of pushing their careers off the bottom rung. Like many of their musical heroes that have paved the way before them, American Aquarium can wrap the ugliest feelings in the most spirited soundscape. Sonically uplifting instrumentation and vivid, wrenching lyrics illuminate the dark side of hanging out in rock 'n' roll limbo, but also how the band has clawed their way out of it. Through their struggle to sustain their career and resist the temptation of fire, American Aquarium's demons have hung around. But so have they.

DISCOGRAPHY:
Burn.Flicker.Die (2012)
Live in Raleigh (2012)
Small Town Hymns (2010)
Dances for the Lonely (2009)
Bones (2008)
The Bible & The Bottle (2008)
Antique Hearts (2006)
Evan Felker
Evan Felker
Turnpike Troubadours have taken the Texas/Red Dirt scene by storm the last couple years with a mix of excellent songwriting, superior musicianship and a killer live show. Turnpike frontman Evan Felker displays wisdom beyond his years in his lyrics and has garnered well-deserved attention from respected writers for his process and dedication. He'll be playing solo acoustic for an up-close and personal look.
Venue Information:
Cain's Ballroom
423 N Main St.
Tulsa, OK, 74103
http://www.cainsballroom.com