Drew Holcomb & The Neighbors

Doc Roc Presents

Drew Holcomb & The Neighbors

Humming House

Wed Apr 15

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

Cain's Ballroom

Tulsa, OK

$14.00 - $28.00

This event is all ages


Advance $14 | Day of Show $16 | Door $16 | Mezzanine (21+) $28

There is a $2 fee that applies to each ticket purchased at the Cain's Box Office.

No re-entry! No smoking! No refunds!

Oklahoma Joe’s will be serving their full menu from 7pm – 9pm.

Drew Holcomb & The Neighbors
Drew Holcomb & The Neighbors
Some artists are able to articulate a vision at the very beginning of their career, while others hone their craft over time, growing into their vision as they mature.

"I am definitely in the latter category," explains Drew Holocomb, a Tennessee-born, duck hunting, French speaking, bourbon drinking, 1st edition book collecting, golf playing Eagle Scout with a Masters degree in Divinity from Scotland's University of St Andrews (he wrote his dissertation on "Springsteen and American Redemptive Imagination") who has spent the better part of the past decade as a professional musician -- recording, writing, and touring with his band Drew Holcomb & The Neighbors.

Since releasing their first album, 2005's "Washed In Blue," Drew & The Neighbors (Ellie Holcomb, Nathan Dugger, Rich Brinsfield) have established themselves as a formidable indie act, selling more than 75,000 records, playing more than 1,500 live dates, selling-out headline shows, and touring alongside such varied acts as The Avett Brothers, Ryan Adams, Los Lobos, NEEDTOBREATHE, Susan Tedeschi, North Mississippi Allstars, Marc Broussard, and more. Their songs have been used in countless television shows and commercials, most notably in TNT's Emmy Award winning 2011 Christmas Day "NBA Forever" spot, which paired the song "Live Forever" with a mesmerizing montage of past and present NBA video footage.

The hard work has paid off with the band's sixth album "Good Light" showcasing Drew's signature brand of singer/songwriter Americana in its finest form yet. Recorded live at Ardent Studios in Memphis, "Good Light" arrives shortly following Drew's 30th birthday and the birth of his first child, daughter Emmylou (named for -- you guessed it -- Emmylou Harris), with wife and band-mate Ellie Holcomb. I think about my daughter every time I sing the title track, how I want to sing it over her when she is old enough to start understanding the world of truth and consequence," says the Memphis native who now calls Nashville home.

"This album perfectly tells the story for a new stage in my life," explains Drew "On past albums I was searching for my voice, both literally and figuratively. I co-wrote a lot of songs, peppered the music with too many influences, and let too many other voices in my head."

With this album, Drew dedicated himself to the process of songwriting, stripping away extra layers, ridding himself of past boundaries and expectations. He wrote more than 40 songs for "Good Light," mostly alone on his 1934 Gibson Archtop, eventually whittling the selections down to a final 12 tracks.

Drawing from personal experience to craft songs that speak to all of us, Drew explores the universal need to find meaning and joy in the midst of heartbreak and disappointment throughout "Good Light." The last song on the album Tomorrow opens with the lyric, 'Nothing ever turns out like you thought it would.' It's a theme that permeates the album.

"I have been through really difficult things," Drew continues. "When I was 17, I lost my younger brother, and have lived through the grief of that great absence. On the other hand, I have experienced the joy of being married to the girl I always wanted, and have been loved really well by her... Everyone has all these different ingredients; our geography, our family, our interests, the places we have been and the places we long to see, the loves we have found and the loves we have lost. Each of us has a story, and it's the only one we can tell. With this album I'm telling my story, in the hope that it helps other people tell theirs."
Humming House
Humming House
The spotlight on Nashville, with its musical values and timeless traditions, is currently bright. And no band embodies what's right about 21st century Nashville more completely than the quintet known as Humming House.

It's the way they weave together threads of Music City's folk, soul, and bluegrass legacies. It's in the inspirational and revealing songwriting. It's in their acoustic instrumentation, presenting mandolin, fiddle, acoustic guitar and bass in fresh roles. It's in the pleasant tension between rousing energy and nuanced arrangements. And it's in the voices, with two complimentary stylists up front and backed by the full band's rapturous harmonies.

Revelries, due out March 24, 2014 on Nashville label Rock Ridge Music, is the third recording bearing the Humming House name, yet it's something of a debut. Version one of the band came together in 2011 when songwriter Justin Wade Tam called on some friends from a local Celtic music jam to flesh out recordings of songs he'd written. The sessions, assisted by Tam's star producer colleagues Mitch Dane and Vance Powell, mixed strains of bluegrass and Irish braided with vintage swing and open-throated early 60s hootenanny folk music. Humming House earned some quick attention for videos of its infectious songs "Cold Chicago" and "Gypsy Django." They landed performance slots with tastemakers such as Lightning 100, Daytrotter and the Americana Music Association festival. They had chops, respect, and trajectory.

After that, two personnel additions galvanized the band. Leslie Rodriguez brought a lustrous female vocal to mesh with Tam's hearty singing. And fiddler Bobby Chase brought classical training and down-home fire. That rounded out a band of highly skilled instrumentalists, including Josh Wolak on mandolin and Ben Jones on acoustic bass. Between the five of them, there's scarcely a genre or period that somebody in the band hasn't spent time learning or embracing, from Leslie's early love of show tunes to Josh's time playing bluegrass to Bobby's occasional beat boxing. They're the picture of East Nashville's melting pot musical culture, and Revelries is the first album these musicians have written, arranged and recorded together.

As complete as they are in the studio and on record, Humming House is fundamentally and emphatically a live band. With scarcely a tube's worth of amplification or electricity and a drum kit's worth of percussion distributed among the band members, they emit force on stage and demand attention. They've rocked rooms of all sizes and played Forecastle Festival, Bristol's Rhythm & Roots Festival, and the Cayamo Cruise with the elite of Americana. They opened the new Music City Roots hall in The Factory in 2014, sharing the bill with Emmylou Harris and Rodney Crowell.

Vocals are the emotional core and lure of Humming House. They are five voices deep, with a galvanizing male/female twin attack over the top. Tam and Rodriguez sing as soloists or a duet, depending on the song. Humming House works out careful hand-offs and big harmonies, including frequent passages that are just vocalizing, chanting beautiful music on top of their robust instrumental attack.

The title of Revelries comes from a lyric in the tenth track on the album, "Carry On," a feisty and ambitious song in which delicate charango plays counterpoint to a muted guitar. The rhythm is jagged and intoxicating. By the time we get there we've heard the striding opener "Run With Me," the quick-stepping waltz "Fly On" and Leslie's showcase song, the smoldering and bluesy "Nuts, Bolts and Screws." The album's first single, "Great Divide," is a fervent ode to travel, motion, and new frontiers—a recurring theme that's also touched on in the fiddle and accordion-driven "Hitch Hike" and the rapturously rocking "Freight Train." A classic jazz ribbon of smoke drifts through the magic "I'm A Bird." And then, after "Carry On," Revelries concludes on the drifting "Atlantic"—a throwback folk song that evokes old sea shanties.

If the new Nashville means anything, it's about musicianship and authenticity. Quite often that results in sounds that are fascinating and appealing to critics and fellow musicians. Occasionally, artistry emerges that's both profound and widely appealing. And when it does, as with Humming House, it's cause for revelry.
Venue Information:
Cain's Ballroom
423 N Main St.
Tulsa, OK, 74103
http://www.cainsballroom.com